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The Mystery of Pink Flamingo

THE MYSTERY OF THE PINK FLAMINGO

The Kitsch Icon

By Laura Martínez

We chat with Javier Polo, director of the documentary film about the mysterious iconography behind this particularly pink bird. An animal that is rarely seen, but at the same time is omnipresent. The film has been released in cinemas across Spain, a heroic deed in times of pandemic.

It can appear as a pool float on the beach, on the vase that your mother gave you as a Xmas pressie, or on the lighter that your friend passes you need a light outside a bar. At first glance these things have nothing in common, but if you look closely, you’ll discover that they are all flamingo inspired, either in its form or through drawings and borrowed elements: the beak, the skinny legs that bend backwards, its pink plumage. It’s here, there and everywhere. Pink flamingo fever has haunted the world for longer than we can remember, and at last someone has launched an investigation into all this madness.

 

Javier and Guillermo Polo – The Polo Brothers – have embarked on a coast-to-coast journey across the USA; the land of eccentricity, the land of kitsch. It is the beginning, and most likely will be the end, of this obsession. The Polos travelled to Miami, Las Vegas, Chicago and Los Angles in search of the true meaning behind the pink flamingo. Javier is clear about why he chose this particular topic: “I didn’t choose the pink flamingo, the pink flamingo chose me, just like Rigo in the film. I couldn’t escape, it was so inevitable that the only way of curing the fever was by literally making a film about it.

Javier remembers that one of the most gratifying parts of the filmmaking process was when he searched for the actors to play the characters who are in love with the figure of the pink flamenco. They all accompany the main character, Rigo Pex, (Meneo) whom Javier describes as: “musician, performer, Tasmanian Devil, Radio 3 presenter and cultural agitator, in that order.” Rigo is helped on his quest by kitsch obsessed actor and director Eduardo Casanova, Alicante based painter and muralist Antonyo Marest, the irreverent, cult filmmaker John Waters and music guru Allee Willis, the songwriter behind many hit songs, including Earth, Wind and Fire’s foot stomping classic “September.”

Known as one of the music industry’s most colourful characters, she unfortunately passed away after suffering a cardiac arrest in 2019. Javier gets emotional when he talks about her: “born in 1947 in Detroit, she was a lesbian whose love of black music and culture developed early. An artist in the broadest sense of the word and an admirable person, she was always brave and pioneering, and she gave us an awe-inspiring interview to close the film.” Despite the fine choice of characters in the film, Javier admits that they were gutted to miss out on interviewing singer and songwriter of Electric Six, Tyler Spencer, and he also admits that the hardest part was editing down John Waters’ interview because “everything that came out of his mouth was pure gold.”

Javier and Guillermo’s cinephilia comes from their parents; their mother took them to see Tarantino films at the tender age of eight, and their father showed them classic flicks by the Marx Brothers, Kubrick and Woody Allen. “We always had long chats and debates about films. The truth is that we had the privilege of discovering so much cinema, at a very young age, so it was a natural that we ended up as filmmakers.” The film’s predilection for pastel tones and colourful aesthetics are influenced by legendary directors from Wong Kar Wai and Wes Anderson to Pedro Almodóvar, and are also present in our hotels: Paradiso, Tropicana and Cubanito, where part of the film was shot.The next film by the Polo Brothers will be a black comedy called “Pobre Diablo” (Poor Devil), which this time will see Guillermo take up the directing reigns, about a frustrated writer who has to travel from Asturias to Benidorm with his brother’s dead body in order to fulfil his dying wish. One thing’s for sure, they don’t lack imagination….

 
 
 
 
 
 
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The Bleuve

THE BLEUVE

Concept Hotel Group and The Bleuve join forces to say goodbye to summer.

The independent brand of hand-painted jackets has created a design that breathes the arty aesthetic and the highly valued values ​​of the PARADISO IBIZA ART Hotel group brand.

 

This jewel jacket will be auctioned on September 5, 2021. The amount raised from this auction will go to the NGO Ibiza Preservation Foundation, which ensures the same values ​​as both brands.

 

The auction will be carried out based on the bids made by the public that attends the event in person or via streaming to the online event that will be broadcast.

The Bleuve was born with the aim of seeking to be part of a fashion sector that is more aware of the processes of creating designs through slow fashion and upcycling, giving a second life to vintage denim jackets.

 

Our brand values ​​are NATURE, ART and SUSTAINABILITY and we try to represent them in the designs of each limited edition collection. Having a The Bleuve jacket in your closet means having something that represents your way of being and of seeing life. With what you know who you really are, you are comfortable and you take pride in being who you are.

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Legendary Hotels

LEGENDARY HOTELS

Chateau Marmont: The Hotel that knows how to Keep things Quiet
By Pablo Burgués

 

If a celebrity hasn’t overdosed in your hotel; if a rock star hasn’t sashayed around your lobby in the buff; if no one has used one of your rooms to stage an orgy of biblical proportions… then I feel morally obliged to say that yours is not a decent hotel, but a sad campsite with doors. Or worse still, a resort.

And if the homo sapiens were a trustworthy animal, a hotel’s category would not be measured by anodyne TripAdvisor reviews, but by the quantity and quality of the debauchery that goes on behind its walls. If this was so, the Chateau Marmont in Los Angeles would have more stars than Orion’s belt.

 

One of these shameful (as well as wonderful) events featured Led Zeppelin drummer John Bonham. One hot summer night the band’s manager was in a meeting in the Marmont’s lobby with the lawyers from a major record company. After months of tough negotiations, a new multi-million dollar contract was about to be finalised between the two parties. Well, good old Sir Bonham couldn’t think of a better way to show his appreciation and respect for the label than to ride around the hotel lobby on his Harley, stark naked. According to the story, nobody was hurt, but I hope the bike’s saddle was made of quality leather, because the combination of “ fake leather” + “summer sweat” + “bareback sphincter” can generate a vacuum effect of more than 7 atmospheres and they wouldn’t be able to remove the bike from your arse with a circular saw.

And while we’re on the subject of skin and drums, another famous episode had Keith Moon (the uncool one from The Who) as its star. After seeing a television fly out of Keith Richards’ (the uncool Rolling Stone) bedroom window, he decided to up the ante and threw his sofa out of the window and into the swimming pool. In his own words, he did it “to see if it could float”, an existential crisis that has accompanied man since his origins.

As far as fucking goes, rumour has it that Johnny Depp and his then girlfriend (the always discreet and restrained Kate Moss) got down and dirty on each and every single bed in the Marmont. Not bad going considering that there are 63 rooms in the hotel, many of them with extra beds… but personally I find Dennis Hopper’s numbers way more interesting, who instead of wasting time and money jumping from room to room decided to get just one room and put 50 Playboy bunnies in there for himself. Undoubtedly two very different, though equally respectable, ways of finding oneself.

However, it wasn’t all laughs at 8221 Sunset Boulevard… one night in March 1982, three dudes with real bad reputations met up there to do suitably bad things. They were Robert de Niro, Robin Williams and John Belushi. At dawn, the first two went home, but the third kept going and going and ended up partying forever… 5 days later he was found dead in his room, having overdosed on a speedball (a mixture of heroin and cocaine) injection, a combination less advisable than an eye drop with Super Glue 3.

 

If you are wondering whether all this cool and crazy stuff really happened in the Marmont, and how is it possible then it’s down to the fact that one of the secrets of the hotel’s success is discretion. In fact, there are hardly any photos or videos of the things I’ve just told you about, so many of them are hover somewhere between reality and rumour. So as Harry Cohn, founder of Columbia Pictures, once said: “If must get in to trouble, always do it at the Chateau Marmont.”

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Make diners great again

MAKE DINERS GREAT AGAIN

Por Laura Martínez / Foto: Adam Johnston

Diners, those eternal symbols of American pop culture, omnipresent 20 years ago, are now in the doldrums. Exorbitant rents and generational change have affected a sector that refuses to be a relic of a bygone age. These wonderful eateries have played key roles in some of cinema’s most iconic scenes.

 

n 1990, the hipster-glassed genius Martin Scorsese released “Goodfellas”, the cult classic that is one of the most foul-mouthed movies in history (the word f**k is used 300 times). This masterpiece has a scene where Joe Pesci and Ray Liotta are waiting to steal a truck from the car park of one of the oldest diners in New York: The Airline Diner. This classic is now owned by the Jackson Hole franchise, which luckily maintained the diner’s interior design and façade intact when they took over. Opened back in 1952, its famous old neon ‘Airline’ sign, classic pink and chrome interior, original jukeboxes and the gumball machine are authentic relics.

Another diner that has hosted its share of shoots is Dinah’s Family Restaurant in L.A. Movies like “Little Miss Sunshine” and “Drive” filmed scenes there, featuring greasy spoon classics such as pancakes washed down with strawberry milkshakes and coffee, served at its unmistakable semicircle sofas. The two most famous movies shot there are “The Big Lebowski” and “Pulp Fiction”. The Coen brothers comedy, full of unforgettable quotes, filmed a scene here where those nihilists that The Dude warned us about (“These guys don’t believe in anything”) gathered. One of these nihilists could have been Vincent Vega, who also sat down to breakfast in Dinah’s in Tarantino’s blockbuster. The house speciality (apart from movie shoots) is fried chicken and ribs with barbecue sauce.

 

Let’s continue with Tarantino and his obsession with these calorific temples. The first location he used for a film was, precisely, a diner, Pat & Lorraine’s Coffee Shop in Los Angeles. The scene in “Reservoir Dogs” has Mr Pink (Steve Buscemi) explaining his reluctance to leave money for waiters with the immortal line “I don’t tip,” a comment that leads to a heated debate between the characters, including Mr Brown (Quentin himself).

A list about the cinema’s essential diners couldn’t be complete without mentioning “Mullholland Drive” by David Lynch.” Winkie’s Diner – now called Caesar’s – is the place where one character describes his dream about a terrifying troll who runs the diner. If you wanna recreate this scene for yourself, you’ll have to travel to Gardena, south of L.A.

There’s also a diner in Ibiza that has been getting a lot of attention: Romeo’s Motel & Diner. Concept’s latest establishment has already hosted lots of shoots, with the most talked about being Diana Kunst filming part of the video for The Rolling Stones song “Criss Cross.” Our succulent menu features a selection of impossibly large milkshakes and the best hot dogs you’ve ever tasted. All of course without forgetting the Mediterranean touch. It looks like diner culture is gonna be with us for a little while longer…

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Alehk Rod

ALEHK ROD

Paradiso Art Hotel from august 2nd to september 10th

This multidisciplinary artist from Madrid is one of a kind: diagnosed with an ocular anomaly that reduces her visual acuity, Alehk sees the world through contrasts of light and textures that minimise her spatial perception.

Her uniqueness lies in the way she looks at things: she transforms an object by reconstructing it and capturing it in painting. Colour, geometry and the abstract shape the work of this peculiar artist.

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